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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
. whatever, science, history, it's all going to be harder. maybe you can get through math without reading and maybe not. with the kids can't read well, some of them will not get through high school. if your kids can't read well, their choices and opportunities in life will be limited. they're not going to have as many choices. but the cool thing about books, the really terrific thing is that there are so many really good books out there for them to read. right here the at the book fair, there are a lot of looks that really absolutely -- to your kids. "harry potter," a turkic series, wimpy kids, terrific illustrations. books about sports. fine, if you have boys let them read anything. comic books, great, graphic novels, sports, almanacs certainly, cook books, why not? as long as they are reading because they will get better at it. who love soccer? yeah would love soccer. are you better now? how come? we play a lot. the same with reading. if you read more, you get better at it and it gets each year. you read better books. you have something that -- so i would love you all to get that into y
is an unabashed liberal but she is also on tv but she has a ph.d. in something, political science or something and charles murray would not want to be called a pundit. he is famous for controversy over the bell curve. this looks at white working-class to try to separate class from race which complicate everything and he looks at how the values of the lower white working class of gone down. there is this white elite adopted middle-class value, the working class lost those, a complex argument, advanced two places to describe these things. it is interesting, it is more than somebody ranting and raving. >> a scholar with the american enterprise institute as well, probably not fair to call him a political pundits. what about glen beck? he launched his own imprint, but his fox show is off the air. can you see the result of his sales? >> as far as i can tell glyn back, what he has been doing since he left fox has been trying to build a brand that reaches of very dedicated community not only through satellite oriented radio show but a new site called the blaze and other things going on through his web
the sciences and humanities, which i don't think should be separated but often are, and let with other colleagues and researchers and create interesting collaborations. thank you so much. perhaps very appropriately, the great new zealand bibliographer donald francis mackenzie said if you know how to read it, every book is alive with the judgment of its maker. in the business of bibliography is learning how to read the human presences in every recorded task. and i think that we have certainly seen an example of how to recover those human judgments. those human presences through a capacious and db2 learned every article. he's he is the author of eight novels, two values in 10 volumes of essays in as many articles as some of our nations finest journals. a past deputy chairman of the national endowment for the humanities, he is the recipient of a national book critics circle award red the guggenheim and even a rock rockefeller award. when you think about his work in cytogenetics. i'm not entirely sure, but i'm sure that he can inform us about the nature of fiction, the book, and the future
she has a ph.d. in something. political science i think and i think charles murray would be gummy probably would not want to be called the pundit. he is famous for the controversy over the bell curve but this is a book that looks at the white working class and looked at the white working class to try to separate class from race which complicates everything and he looks at how the values of the lower white working class has gone down hill and there is this sort of white elite adopts a middle-class and sort of a complex argument. he goes to two places to describe these things. is inching and provocative book so more than someone is ranting and raving. >> host: and of course -- with the american enterprise institute so not fair to call him a political pundit. what about glenn beck? he launched his own imprint but his flock show is off the air. can you see the results in his sales? >> guest: as far as i can tell, glenn beck, what he has been doing since he left fox's has been really trying to build a brand that reaches a dedicated community not only through satellite oriented radio sh
. you say that this is unsound science and potentially could lead to problems. why do you believe that there is not a value in at least looking at this gunman's dna? >> well, first of all, let me say that my heart goes out to all the people in newtown, connecticut. this was an horrific series of events. second of all, the major problem that i have as a geneticist is that it's impossible to gain much information with the sample size of one. so what you are looking at is one person's dna, and you're trying to say that it's different than other people. but you only have a sample size of one. >> would it be helpful, do you think, to look at the dna of other shooters of those from previous mass shootings? >> well, again, the problem is, we have probably less than five or even ten people that we're talking about. when studies -- accurate genetic studies are done on a whole population, we look for hundreds of different people, and you have to show a strong correlation with that. and the second problem would be what are we trying to look for? i mean, we're going -- the whole idea is you'r
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the benefits with the risks. all prescription nsaids, like celebrex, ibuprofen, naproxen, and meloxicam have the same cardiovascular warning. they all may increase the chance of heart attack or stroke, which can lead to death. this chance increases if you have heart disease or risk factors such as high blood pressure or when nsaids are taken for long periods. nsaids, including celebrex, increase the chance of serious skin or allergic r
science correspondent robert bazell is at columbia university hospital. >> reporter: good morning, andrea. she has a blood clot just below her ear on a blood vessel that drains blood from the brain but critically, it's not in the brain itself, which makes a difference in the prognosis. it's still a dangerous situation. you can see where the red dot there is on the diagram. it's being dissolved with blood thinners and over a period of days and all indications are that she will make a complete recovery. this is a dangerous situation, but she's going to be fine. andrea? >> good news. happy new year to you as well. thank you, robert. >>> now to the weather. scattered showers and thunderstorms are likely today throughout the southeast and gulf coast. some areas may receive over an inch of rain. isolated snow showers through the ohio valley and into the virginias with one to three inches of snow. snow. and heavier amounts over higher elevations. much of the country remains quite chilly with temperatures below average and partly cloudy conditions through the western united states. that's a look
today. she was treated sunday for a blood clot. more from nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell who was at the hospital. good morning, robert. >> reporter: good morning, andr andrea. we don't know a lot of what's going on here. columbia university hospital is not saying much. we have a one sentence statement from hillary clinton's office which says, as you said, is being treated for a blood clot and it stemmed from a concussion she suffered a few days ago. the problem is that concussions, when they lead to blood clots, the blood clots are not usually treated with blood thinners as they say she's being treated. if she has a blood clot that occurred because she was sitting around or something, they would treat that with blood thinners and that would be fine. but there may be more to this story that we don't know. we'll have to watch it the next few days. as they say they're keeping her under observation to maek sure she's okay. andrea? >> let's hope for the best and thanks for the update, robert. >>> raising taxes on the wealthy is separating the two parties as the deadline
at the urban institute, and alisha coleman- jensen jensen, a social science fellow at the usda. i want to show this map, which might surprise people. virginia, maryland, pennsylvania, new york, they have less food insecurity. in the deep south, states like georgia, alabama, mississippi, texas and in california, there is more food insecurity. why? guest: there is regional variation, ranging from a low of 8% to a high of 19%. research has shown there are factors for households within the state, and also factors like economic conditions at the state level and state policies that affect food insecurity. the poverty rate in the unemployment rate varies across states, the level of education berries and other factors such as region varies, and other factors such as participation in food programs varies. the cost of housing, the average wages -- all of these factors affect food insecurity. host: susan, dayton, ohio. good morning. caller: i really admire the program and an emphasis on nutritious food, and i was wondering if there were any thoughts going toward that same thing with the snap program. gue
in debates in school and college, they are often rather more about style than sub science. sometimes they appear to miss the point entirely. i remember at the student union, i was president once, we had a motion which instructed the united states to remove its troops instructed the united states that is a bit of big ask. here in this place, debates are different. debates have consequences. the most significant speeches are not necessarily the most stylish or the most fluid. they are the ones born of knowledge, of passion, of commit, and of concern. most of all, they are made by those who are here not only to speak for themselves, but to represent the people. todayed that is your opportunity, to speak out, based on your convictions and concerns to speak for young people whom you represent. and to speak out on issues which are relevant and where you can exert an influence inspect doing so, it will be in the best tradition of parliament democracy. before i finish, can i pay tribute to the administrate colleague. the administrate of children and families who is responsible for improving
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> okay. two and a half minutes left. we've talked a lot about the resilience of the markets even in the face of the fiscal cliff market. maybe the market has been taking this in stride. look what happened today. we almost got to 20, the yellow flag area. we haven't been to 20 on the vix since back in july, early july, and today we're up 3.7% at 1928. however, look at a one--year chart of the dow comparing it to the vix. what often happens is when the vix peaks as it did in june and july, that can mark a bottom in the stock market so we're starting to move up again. i'm just saying. not trying to forecast anything and here's what happened today at the dow, sort of falling off here in the latter part of the hour but not off. off the lows of the day. down 21 points. material stocks were the strength today. up 1.5%. everybody else was either unchanged or lower. what do you make of the increased volatility or increased fear here, david darst, as we go into the end of the year
happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> we're following two breaking news stories this hour. we now know the united states will in fact go over the fiscal cliff at midnight tonight. the senate is closing in on a deal, but the house has said it will not vote tonight. possibly take up any action tomorrow. the other breaking news story we're following, new details emerging of secretary of state hillary clinton's blood clot. doctors are now revealing it's located in a vein between her brain and her skull. they say it did not result in a stroke or any neurological damage. we're following both of these stories. i want to bring in tom foreman on the fiscal cliff. the emerging deal that's out there, no deal yet, and no deal until it's finalized, not only in the senate, as you know, tom, but the house of representatives and signed into law by the president. >> there's so many contentious details here. any one of them might trip this up, but there are two big pillars we're talking about today more than anything else. the first one seems to have been suc
's hangover. the study published in the journal of food science found asparagus protects the liver from toxins, including alcohol. so coming to a bar near you. >> a beer and some asparagus! >>> it's hard to imagine a tougher new year's resolution to keep than one made by an australian couple. they are in their 60s. they started bright and early this morning planning to run 365 marathons in 2013. yes, that's one a day at more than 26 miles each. they say they are doing it to inspire people to make conscious lifestyle choices like they have made. >> 20 years ago, i wouldn't able to run one city block. i couldn't run more than 100 meters. since they have i lost 50 pounds and i feel so much better. >> not only that but i get a younger man without a divorce. >> wow. >> he is actually 28. [ laughter ] >> ten years ago, jeanette was actually diagnosed with breast cancer and given six months to live. she credits her diet of raw vegan food with saving her life. that's ambitious. one marathon would be enough for me. >> that's amazing. have you ever run a marathon. i have not. i have covered a lot of the
to become its director. he began at oxford in the junior position in law and social science of what he wrote to the ranks about the institution to become a tech executive. the cultural nature of human development, the accidental gorilla, peggy pascoe's book on law and race in america. daniel walker and his history of america between 1815 and 1848. ladies and gentlemen, niko pfund. anna. >> thank you very much for coming here. for listening to us talk friday afternoon. i'm so that we chose to spend your afternoon with us. i have spent 10 years working for a library in and spent about half of that time physically working in a library. as a director of nyu press, i am thrilled to be here and to talk to you about publishing. i was asked to give you a quick overview of our philosophy. it sounds a little pretentious, but i would say that in terms of how i look at what we do, it is squarely driven by the message of oup. we often say that we don't exist to make money, but we do have to make money to do the things that we exist to do. it really doesn't want form all the work that we engage in. perso
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >>> all right. power rundown time. michelle is with us, kayla too. first up, the fiscal cliff just four days away. it doesn't look like anybody is rising above. at least not as far as i can tell. would it be better, i'm not sur
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> okay, we've got the breaking news we're following here in washington. we've been thinking about it. we've been talking about it for a long time. guess what, the united states is now going over the so-called fiscal cliff. that's because the house of representatives is adjourning as we speak right now, will not consider any legislation that may be passed by the senate later tonight. for all practical purposes, at least technically, we're going over the physical cliff. we'll see what happens over the next few hours. let's bring in our chief business correspondent ali velshi, joining us from new york. practically speaking, i'm not sure it does have a huge impact, although technically we're going over the cliff. >> sure, technically, we are going over the cliff. people have been asking me. what it means is, if it doesn't get fixed tomorrow or in the next couple of days, we are over the cliff. the issue is, do we hit an outcropping on the way down, or can we get a parachute and get rescued? bott
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> good morning, him ecarol costello. it's 30 minutes past the hour. time to check our top stories. we're 30 seconds away from the start of trading at the new york stock exchange. representatives from the new york national guard are ringing the opening bell today. [ bell ringing ] more than 4,000 guards and airmen helped the victims of superstorm sandy. investors are still concerned about the looming fiscal cliff. >>> blizzard warning in up to six states. in arkansas the national guard has been called to provide ambulance service for residents. heavy snow and strong winds will lead to whiteout conditions across the ohio river valley. the heaviest snow is expected to move into western pennsylvania and new york state this afternoon. >>> hundreds of american families wanting to adopt russian children may have their dreams dashed. they have given final approval for a ban on such adoptions, seen as payback for a recently signed u.s. law imposing travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>>
in science. it turns out, your dog or your cat may be depressed. and the treatment that works for humans could also work for your pets. it's true. abc's dan harris has the story. >> reporter: of all the absurd things we do for our pets, the massages, the themed birthday parties, the treadmills, the high-end couture. the paris hilton $325,000 doghouse. >> inside is moldings and lighting and heat and air conditioning. >> reporter: of all of the over-the-top pampering, this picture, at first glance at least, struck me as the apex of this particular brand of mania. this doe-eyed little pooch is staring into an artificial sunlight generator, in case he's getting depressed from lack of sun exposure. it's made by a company called pawsitive lighting. then, i heard of the inventor. he was suffering from a severe case of insomniinsomnia. max's doctor told him to use a bright box to counter the gloomy days. it worked. not only on max, but on his golden retriever, luke. >> luke and i were basking in the sun. and he was completely drawn to the light. >> reporter: max did research. and a lot of vets s
. and they're not addressing the real problems of america, which are jobs, productivity, education, science research, and withering infrastructure. this is appalling, and the american people should watch whatever's happening with a sense of disgust. >> you feel clearly very strongly. >> yes. >> why do you think we've got to this stage? what could turn it into a more positive narrative? >> i think we are at this place because the role of muddle in politics has overwhelmed, the lobbying process has overwhelmed the sound financial planning for the american people. we have a mess in the health care spending in the out years, which is real. but the costs of providing medical care through pharmaceutical monopolies, insurance monopolies and hospitalization monopolies means american people pays more than double what the rest of the people pay in the world. we're not fixing that. >> diana, is that your assessment of what we witnessed today? >> we are not making real attempts to cut spending, which is the problem. we have $16 trillion in debt. $1 trillion deficit. and what we're talking about today i
... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> since this show began in february, we have closed out nearly every saturday program with a segment called "foot soldiers" and it is a feature highlighting one person or group who has created positive action in the communities for change. this is large or small. and the foot soldiers have ranged from the three new jersey girls who was a presidential moderator, to dr. mcstuffins who shows girls they, too, can be doctors. and the father and son teen who got out to get out the vote for people during hurricane isaac and simply because they had a vote, and activism. all of our foot soldiers are changing our lives. f for the first time ever, i have a table full of them. and i am joined by a director of a support for children whose parents are in prison, and also, a founder for children of lgbt youth, and also project director of a center for victims of sexual assault, and also, the drek er tor of osborne association which offers rehabilitation for those in the criminal justice system. i
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. man: we are rolling. all right, mama's gonna bring it home, ama's gonna bring it home. oh, no! man: oh, mom! aah! nnouncer: challenge your kids to be active and eat healthy. all right, let's see what you can do. let's go. announcer: searc"we can" for ideas on how to get healthy together. >> i am elizabeth macdonald with your fox business brief. lawmakers making little progress on our debt crisis. senate majority leader harry reid taking the floor at the top of that hour to say there are still some issues to iron out. there will be no bearing fiscal cliff. without the compromise, though prices could jump to eight dollars a gallon. secretary hillary clinton remains in the hospital. she is being treated from a blood clot. she is expected to stay at the hospital for two days while being treated with a blood thinner. that is the latest from the fox business network. giving you the power to prosper. ♪ dagen: how much would you pay to get a ride home on new year's eve after partying? it looks like
or dropping off the wagon. you know, this is brand new science. this is a plan that basically says, you can eat all your calories in your day but you're going to start eating in eight-hour windows even just three days a week, 11:00 to 7:00, 9:00 to 5:00. >> it's controversial. again it goes against some of the things we're going to talk about go against things we've been taught for years. the claims are pretty dramatic. you say if you follow this diet you'll look younger, feel younger and dramatically reduce your risk for getting the major diseases of our time. >> we're sleeping less than ever, working more than ever and eating more than ever, not giving our bodies a chance to process all of the food that we're taking in and all the toxins. by feasting for eight hours and fasting for 16 -- >> of famine -- >> even just three days a week, you'll reset your body to get on that path. i lost seven pounds in ten days when i adopted the plan. >> by the way, people could lose 20 pounds in six weeks. let's start. breakfast, the most important meal of the day? not according to you. >> delay breakfast
% in 2011. if you went into nursing 30 years ago, you didn't anticipate this. that's what happens as science e evolves and things change. requirements change. >> i want to talk about another subject because everybody is talking about it. the hannah storm, the fire that explodes from the girl. what happened in that situation to her? a lot of people think is this uncommon to be in that kind of situation where it's dangerous and don't realize the gas is on and v an explosion. >> you have the gas on, and you think it's lit. what happened in this situation is she came back and it wasn't lit. she went to relight it and all of this propane had been gathering during that time. propane is heavy, and it was just sitting there. of course, you can't see it, but she was not lighting just a small amount of gas at that point. she was unknowingly lighting a large amount of gas and han explangs. when you light a propane grill and if it goes out and doesn't work, you can't just relight it immediately because you've got much more gas in front of you you. >> we're looking at the pictures of the injuries, the bu
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> all right. i want to follow up on the breaking news we've been reporting. the secretary of state, hillary clinton, has been released. she was been discharged from the hospital in new york. her doctors saying they are confident she will make a full recovery. we just got a couple tweets in from her daughter, chelsea clinton, who was seen walking out of the hospital with her mom and with the former former pre. grateful my mom discharged from the hospital and is heading home even more grateful her medical team confident she'll make a full recovery. she also tweeted thank you to the doctors, nurses and staff at new york for taking great care of my mom. we're all thrilled that the secretary of state is heading home after four days in the hospital. let' discuss this and more with our cnn contributors, the democratic strategist, form er bush white house secretary, ari fliber. goes without saying, you're thrilled she's headinging home. >> shell see's so cautious, so for her to get out there and say something positive is ex
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "squawk box" this morning. look at futures we averted. the dow looks like it would open 86 points higher, s&p 50025 points higher and the nasdaq open up about 52 points higher. >> our next guest was confident we would get a deal when we talked to him 48 hours ago. senator, you did call this correct on monday, a deal was close. we reached that deal. what do you think about it afterwards thinking about the moving parts. >> if there's anybody in the senate had a reason to vote against this, it was me. i've been livid and talking to myself over the last year and a half. i'm surprised they didn't commit me on the plane yesterday coming down. look, when you're trying to save our great nation, when you're trying to deal with these massive deficits we have, you have to use your head and not your heart. when you're dealing with a president that, let's face it, is a spend a holic and really has shown no leadership on this issue. you have to use your head. at the end of the
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)